Braised Duck Open Ravioli in an Herb and Cider Infused Broth

Winner, 2001 Duck Recipe Contest, Chef Frank Costantino

Serving Size {6 Servings}

Ingredients


4 each Maple Leaf Farms Bone In Duck Leg and Thigh


Pasta:


2 1/2 oz All-Purpose Flour


1 1/2 oz Chestnut Flour


3 Egg Yolks


3/4 Teaspoon Olive Oil


1 1/2 Teaspoon Milk


1 Tablespoon Minced Sage (reserve stems)


1 Tablespoon Chopped Italian Parsley (reserve stems)


Pinch Salt


Duck:


As Needed Salt, Black Pepper


1 Cup Small Dice Onions


1/2 Cup Small Dice Carrots


1/4 Cup Small Dice Celery


2 Granny Smith Apples, peeled, diced


1/2 Cup Apple Cider


3 Cups Duck Stock


6 Sprigs Thyme


Filling:


2 Teaspoon Duck Fat


1 Teaspoon Butter


3/4 Cup Porcini Mushrooms, fresh or dried reconstituted


1/4 Cup Applejack


1 Tablespoon Minced Sage


1 Tablespoon Chopped Italian Parsley


Broth:


Reserved Duck Cooking Liquid


1 Tablespoon Parsley


Garnishes:


As Needed Butter


2 Granny Smith Apples, peeled and diced


6 Chestnuts, quartered, fresh or dried reconstituted


Reserved Cracklings

Directions

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1. Remove skin for duck legs; place skin in freezer. Remove tendons from legs; cover and refrigerate.


Pasta: 2. Place all-purpose and chestnut flours in a mound on a clean surface. Create a well in the center of the mound. Place remaining pasta ingredients into well. Using a fork, incorporate the flour slowly to form a rough dough. Using the palm of the hand, knead dough into a soft ball that resists slightly when squeezed (about 5 minutes/moderate pace). Let dough sit covered 15 minutes in the refrigerator.


Duck: 3. Remove duck skin from freezer; cut into 1/4-in. pieces. Place skin into pressure cooker and render, without lid, until golden brown. Drain on paper towels. Keep warm.


4. Remove all but 2 tsp. of duck fat (reserve excess for later use). Heat pan. Season legs with salt and pepper. Sear legs in duck fat until golden brown. Remove from pan; place on paper towels.


5. Add onions, carrots, celery and apples; cook until lightly caramelized. Deglaze with apple cider and reduce until all food particles and caramelized drippings are dissolved. Add stock. Place reserved parsley and sage stems and thyme sprigs in cheesecloth; add. Season with salt and pepper. Bring to a moderate simmer; add duck legs. Cover pressure cooker and secure lid per manufacturer's directions. Cook under pressure for 10 minutes; remove from heat. Depressurize lid per manufacturer's directions. (If pressure cooker is not available, braise in 360°F oven for 50 minutes or until tender.) Remove legs; cool slightly. Strain cooking liquid through a fine chinoise; reserve. Shred meat; keep warm.


6. Remove pasta dough from refrigerator; separate into two or three pieces depending upon size of pasta machine. Starting with the largest opening, roll the dough through once. Fold the two ends into the center, and pass through again. Repeat this step 4 times. Continue to roll dough down to next to last setting.


7. Using a 2-1/2 inch fluted round cutter, cut dough. Place pasta into boiling, salted water; cook for 3 minutes or until al dente.


Filling: 8. Heat fat and butter. Add mushrooms; cook until tender. Deglaze with applejack. Add duck; heat. Add sage and parsley. Adjust seasoning.


Broth: 9. Heat cooking liquid. Add parsley; adjust seasoning.


Garnishes: 10. Heat butter until lightly brown. Add apples; saute until caramelized. Repeat with chestnuts.


To Serve: 11. Lay one sheet of pasta at the bottom of a hot, shallow soup plate. Mound shredded duck mixture on pasta (a 2-1/2 in. ring mold can be used). Sprinkle with 1 tsp. of cracklings. Place another sheet of pasta on top, forming the open ravioli. Spoon 2 oz. broth over ravioli. Garnish with three mounds of caramelized apples placed neatly around the ravioli and three glazed chestnut quarters placed on top of ravioli. Serve immediately.


*Notes: Commercial pasta sheets or wonton wrappers can be substituted for pasta. A spice grinder works very well to grind dried chestnuts. Many Asian markets carry dried chestnuts. Other wild mushrooms or a mix of mushrooms can be substituted.


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